Space

Aerodynamics Report Checks If Wind Can Tip SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket after Landing

Aerodynamics Report Checks If Wind Can Tip SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket after Landing


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SpaceX Falcon 9 Airshaper modelAirshaper

Can wind tip over SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket once it's landed?

AirShaper, an aerodynamics analysis company, has set out to find that out and has shared its full report online, with even more detail being provided tomorrow via its blog.

The Falcon 9 rocket is currently being used to shuttle internet satellites into low-Earth orbit, 60 at a time, for its Starlink mission to provide high-speed internet in hard-to-reach areas on Earth.

SEE ALSO: SPACEX LAUNCHED A SATELLITE INTO ORBIT ON THE FACLON 9, ITS 13TH MISSION OF THE YEAR

Wind and rockets

Wind plays a big role in how the Falcon 9 lands safely and to plan as stability is crucial.

So AirShaper decided to run a preliminary analysis by taking a look at the public model of the rocket and then applying a uniform velocity profile of 50 meters per second.

You can read all details of the analysis here, in a report that is thorough and easy to follow.

The Falcon 9 rocket has been working on its Starlink mission, which is setting up satellites in low-Earth orbit to be able to ping high-speed internet to people in remote areas of the world who don't currently have any, or very intermittent and slow, internet connection.

It's crucial for the Falcon 9 to be able to land steadily, and indeed, natural occurrences can either limit, push back, or altogether destroy certain projects if not all factors are taken into consideration.

Understanding the aerodynamics behind a big project is crucial for it to operate as smoothly as possible, from Elon Musk's Tesla Cybertruck to Musk's SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, they all have to be thoroughly checked and understood in terms of aerodynamics.

It'll be exciting to read a point by point breakdown of the report tomorrow, Saturday 27 June, by AirShaper.


Watch the video: Elon Musk Extremely Emotional Reaction To Falcon Heavy Launch (November 2022).